On Tuesday, July 13, 2010, leaders of the country’s largest civil rights organization accused tea party activists of tolerating bigotry and approved a resolution condemning racism within the political movement.

If the NAACP can muster the backbone to condemn “racism within the political movement”, will they also condemn the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division for refusing to pursue black defendants?

In the case of the Tea Party, there was no federal investigation into the allegations of racism but it did little to stop the NAACP from condemning the Tea Party.

In the case of the Civil Rights Division, however, evidence against the division was advanced by an ex-Justice official who raised “grave questions” about whether the division is “color blind” in its enforcement of the law.

“This testimony raised serious concerns as to whether the Civil Rights Division’s enforcement policies are being pursued in a race-neutral fashion and further calls into question the department’s decision to change course in the New Black Panther Party litigation,” Chairman Gerald Reynolds wrote.

The probe stems from an incident on Election Day in 2008 in Philadelphia, where members of the New Black Panther Party were videotaped in front of a polling place dressed in military-style uniforms and allegedly hurling racial slurs while one brandished a night stick.

Former Justice attorney J. Christian Adams testified last week before the commission that his former employer not only abandoned the Black Panther voter intimidation case for racial reasons, but had instructed attorneys in the division to ignore cases that involve black defendants and white victims.

With the evidence at hand, unless the NAACP holds true to its principles and condemns Eric Holder’s Civil Rights Division, then the NAACP can be declared irrelevant.