When working Americans act irresponsibly with their finances and fall behind on their rent/mortgage, credit card payments we have to answer to our lenders. If we cannot pay, our collateral is seized and our homes are foreclosed and we use whatever resources we have left to start over. That sounds, fair doesn’t it? Personal responsibility and accountability are the key components there.

Not so for the banks. Not so for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, Government Sponsored Enterprises. They appear to be operating under a different set of rules. There doesn’t seem to be accountability whatsoever. I haven’t seen a single CEO fired or a single polititian lose their seat on a single board. There’s something wrong with that.

As all of these recent events slowly unfold, we are getting conditioned to the idea that when companies act irresponsibly and wreak them as we have seen, all we have to do is to look to the national treasury for the bailout. In the case of the banking industry, there are few options. They cannot declare bankruptcy and have the world fall into a depression scenario.

But in the case of the auto industry, we seem to believe the solution to their problem is also in the national treasury They appear to believe that since the banks are getting a bailout, why not them, too.

The message we send to these industries is clear and not healthy for our economy. In the process, we are certainly well on our way to a socialist society with government owning industry.

So who do we blame? Who should we hold responsible? Who is accountable? Who should pay?

Why haven’t we seen heads roll?

The scary part about the recovery plan for the auto industry is in Nancy Pelosi’s plan; save the unions. Truth is, the unions are a large component to the problem.

I read a story at the site of a famous journal which described the efforts of one auto company demonstrating innovation and vision by designing a plan that positioned the company to offer state-of-the-art autos using an alternate energy source. The plan to build these autos would be put into effect once gas prices became high enough. The trouble was that the execs couldn’t figure out how to make money with the plan. The production costs where too high. The main problem was that before the production line even rolls, there is a $5000 to $6000 cost associated with benefits demanded by the unions.

These are the same execs who agreed to the labor union’s demands and signed the labor contract.

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